Applied Music: Science & Nature by Jon Brooks in the Belbury Music Shop

Available now, exclusively from the Belbury Music Shop. The third in a series of limited records made in association with Belbury Music and a variety of associated artists and labels.

“Applied Music: Science & Nature” by Jon Brooks is the second physical release from his Café Kaput label. It comes on heavyweight translucent green vinyl, with a free download code. Sleeve art by Ian Hodgson.

(NB: The free vinyl card will often be tucked inside the lining of the inner sleeve, please check carefully.)

 

The post Applied Music: Science & Nature <br>by Jon Brooks <br>in the Belbury Music Shop appeared first on Ghost Box.

Broken Folk by Seatman and Powell in the Belbury Music Shop

Available now, exclusively from the Belbury Music Shop , Broken Folk, a 10″ EP by Seatman and Powell featuring Belbury Poly. The second in a series of limited records made in association with Belbury Music and a variety of associated artists and labels.

It’s a five track EP of collaborations with folk singer Douglas E. Powell selected from Keith Seatman’s last two albums. It opens with a remix of the title track Broken Folk by Ghost Box veterans, Belbury Poly.



Melancholic and subtly psychedelic, these songs are redolent of supernatural short stories and winter afternoons out on English landscapes. In these dark rustic reveries, Seatman builds a dense collage of electronics, fragmented melody and found sound, around which Powell weaves his dreamlike lyrics.

The 10” is pressed on translucent green vinyl with sleeve art by Belbury Poly’s Jim Jupp. It’s released on Seatman’s own label KS Audio and is the second record produced in association with Belbury Music.

The next Belbury Music record will be Jon Brooks’ Applied Music: Science & Nature in March 2019

The post Broken Folk <br>by Seatman and Powell <br>in the Belbury Music Shop appeared first on Ghost Box.

Applied Music: Plastics Today by Jon Brooks in the Belbury Music Shop

Available now, exclusively from the new Belbury Music Shop. The first in a series of limited records made in association with Belbury Music and a variety of associated artists and labels.

“Applied Music: Plastics Today”  by Jon Brooks  is the first physical release from his Café Kaput label. It comes on heavyweight translucent orange vinyl, with a free download code. Sleeve art and video are by Ian Hodgson. (NB: The free vinyl card will often be tucked inside the lining of the inner sleeve, please check carefully.)

The post Applied Music: Plastics Today <br>by Jon Brooks <br>in the Belbury Music Shop appeared first on Ghost Box.

 

All we need now is a version with a John Foxx vocal on it..

 

OOOps!

I’ve just noticed that the “Music” section is dead in the water..

None of the links actually work.. I’ll sort it out as soon as I can – I’m a bit busy fixing a large qube! renderfarm.. deja vu or what?

A bit of nostalgia..

Yesterday, I rediscovered my stash of Electromancer music.. So I burned the best of it onto an MP3 CD and bunged it in the car JVC.

Today, I’ve been whizzing around town to the sound of Datafreq, Vic Twenty and Zaibatsu. (these are the guys who inspired me to have a go myself), and Butterfly Messiah, DJ Elektro, the odd bit of Global Citizen, 101 Music, Xtro, and LOADS more.

Smashing. 🙂

English Electric Update

We keep getting asked about the imagery and sound that will be associated with English Electric. The imagery is the more difficult issue. We already have a clear vision for the first priority in making an album; the direction of the music.

Regarding imagery; we have a dilemma. There would be a simple logic to basing something on recreating the front of the blue and cream Deltic Diesel prototype. However, there is also a reason for doing something totally fresh. EE is certainly an attempt to move forward, yet will also retain our distinctive style. Simply recreating the Deltic front would be more like another version of History of Modern and would tend to suggest that the music is a further exploration of that theme. We have, as yet, made no decision.

Lyrically, EE seems to be an exploration of how one’s Utopian dreams often end in dystopic failure and regret. Musically, it uses many current sounds and styles. Dresden sounds very ‘OMD,’ Our System is like a Glitch style Stanlow/ROTT if that can be imagined. Helen of Troy sound like Georgia meets first album Depeche. Please Remain Seated, Decimal, and Atomic Ranch use programmed robotic voices and have a hint of Dazzle Ships to them. And there is more..much more!

Andy