Classic Rock, Record Collector

(Photo by Mike Cooper)

THE SHAPE OF THINGS REVIEWS –

7/10 CLASSIC ROCK

Electronic pioneer shows how it’s done.

Named after an HG Wells novel, this album’s title omits the words ‘To Come’, possibly because John Foxx has been living in the future for decades.

Now, the former Ultravox! singer and an influence on all of electro pop, releases his second album with The Maths. And while it’s business as usual – retro synths, papery drum machines, haunted vocals – it’s also as good as ever. Foxx’s talent for melody and lyrics hasn’t left him, and songs like the almost folky ‘September Town’ and the stuttering waltz of ‘The Shadow Of His Former Self’ are in a direct line from ‘Europe After The Rain’ and ‘The Quiet Men’. He’s also as spooky as ever on instrumental opener ‘Spirus’ and the iron wispiness of ‘Invisible Ray’. Anyone tempted by recent electronic music and who wants to see it done by one of its originators would be well advised to nip by here.’

4/5 RECORD COLLECTOR 

Foxx even plays guitar on one track! 

These days John Foxx has so much lead in his pencil, there’s hardly any room for the wooden casing. We’ve lost track of how many LPs he’s delivered in the last five years, though we’ve heard them all – and there’s not a duffer among them.

It seems that Foxx has unfurled The Maths as a convenient banner under which he can deploy a revolving carousel of players with which to collaborate. On his latest, The Shape Of Things, Foxx shares compositional and recording duties with Ben Edwards, aka Benge – his collaborator on last year’s Interplay, and the man who celebrated vintage synths of all shapes and sizes on 2008′s Twenty Systems. Rather than build upon the electro-pop wonderment of the duo’s previous outing, there’s a more experimental edge here, though tracks such as ‘Rear-View Mirror’ and ‘September Town’ would boost Interplay‘s portfolio.

The light-and-shade nuances to instrumentals ‘Psytron’, ‘Modreno’, ‘Astoria’, ‘Invisible Ray’ and ‘Buddwing’, however, are utterly compelling electronic hymns. There’s an aroma of Bowie’s seminal Low at work here, especially on ‘Unrecognised’ which comes fuelled by techno bubbles, striking synth lines a mournful vocal invoking loss.

Another great LP from Foxx and, after Gary Numan’s recent foray into experimental electronica, we hope that a collaboration between the pair is on the cards.’

The Shape Of Things

The second John Foxx And The Maths album, The Shape Of Things was recorded and mixed at Benge’s studio in London. Like the debut album Interplay, it’s the sound of analogue synthesizers and drum machines – and on one track, feedbacking guitars played by Foxx himself. Although there’s a raw edge to the likes of ‘Falling Down’ and ‘Talk’, this album is arguably more reflective and emotional than Interplay. Though not overtly auto-biographical, there’s a sense of looking back over a life and exploring feelings of loss over opportunities and lovers missed; possible futures that will remain unlived.

This limited edition release of the album is in hard-back deluxe artwork by Interplay designer Jonathan Barnbrook and includes a bonus CD of remixes.

It’s available exclusively through the OFFICIAL STORE

The full tracklisting is as follows:

Disc One

01 Spirus

02 Rear-View Mirror

03 Talk

04 Psytron

05 September Town

06 Unrecognised

07 Modreno

08 Falling Away

09 Invisible Ray

10 Vapour Trails

11 Buddwing

12 Tides

13 Astoria

14 The Shadow Of His Former Self

Disc Two

01 Evergreen (Radio Mix)

02 Shatterproof (Wrangler Mix)

03 Where You End And I Begin (Featuring Tara Busch)

04 Summerland (Belbury Poly Mix)

05 The Good Shadow (Tim ‘Love’ Lee Mix)

06 Watching A Building On Fire (Grayed Out Mix)

07 Interplay (Grayed Out Mix)

08 Evergreen (Xeno & Oaklander Mix)

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FOR SALE | EDC SR-99 ANALOG DRUM MACHINE FOR SALE

That’s right – I’m selling one of my SR-99 drum machines.
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It comes with original box (worn), Operating Instructions, and Rhythm Patterns.
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I’m even including a new set of batteries!

sr 99 2 EDC SR 99 ANALOG DRUM MACHINE FOR SALEsr 99 1 EDC SR 99 ANALOG DRUM MACHINE FOR SALE

Here’s a Youtube video of another EDC SR-99 IN action:

My machine is in far better condition!

The auction starts at 9PM on Friday 6th May, and runs for 7 Days. Don’t miss out!

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FOR SALE | VINTAGE BOSS DR-55 ANALOG DRUM MACHINE

 VINTAGE BOSS DR 55 ANALOG DRUM MACHINE

 VINTAGE BOSS DR 55 ANALOG DRUM MACHINE

BOSS DR-55 “DR RHYTHM”
ANALOG DRUM MACHINE.

Full working order. Excellent Condition.Complete with:

  • Original Manual
  • Original Box (Worse for wear)
  • Original Battery Compartment door!
  • New set of batteries!

Shipped in secure packaging from an experienced UK seller.



Here’s what Vintagesynth says about the DR-55:

The DR-55 Dr. Rhythm was released in 1980 and was one of the first step-write-style drum machines, and it was the first rhythm machine in BOSS’ successful Dr. Rhythm Series. It was small, inexpensive and easy to use – perfect for musicians at any level. Incredibly basic controls and sounds made this drum machine an instant hit among guitarists and other musicians looking for drum accompaniment to practice along with and even record into their home recordings.

The DR-55 could store up to six 16-step drum patterns plus an additional two 12-step patterns. The 12-step patterns allowed for 3/4 and 6/8 rhythms. A variation switch allowed you to, on-the-fly, alter the pattern playing. There were only four sounds in the DR-55 which included Snare Drum, Kick Drum, Rim Shot and Hi-Hat. The sounds are comparable to Roland’s CR-series of rhythm machines as well as some of Roland’s cheaper TR-machines (like the TR-505, TR-606). You can globally adjust the Volume, Tempo, Tone and Accent for the drum sounds.

Step-Mode programming was accomplished in a fairly basic manner: Switch the DR-55 into Write Mode and select a sound from the Sound switch, and use the Start button to place the sound and the Stop button to step through the 16 (or 12) beat pattern. Only Kick, Snare, Rim Shot and Accent could be placed in a pattern in step mode–the Hi-Hats could only be programmed as either Off, 8ths, 12ths or 16ths via the Hi-Hat switch. Primitive programming for sure, but very simple and effective.

I’ve programmed this unit, and it works fine.
Click Here to hear THIS UNIT in action..


This machine is currently for auction on ebay:
VINTAGE ANALOG BOSS DR-55 DR RHYTHM DRUM MACHINE